Aarhus on the map: From registration to healthcare

 

by Lizzie Roberts, map by Malika Baiazova and Livio Marc Stöckli

Arriving in a new city can be daunting, especially if you don’t speak the local language or have many contacts. Simple questions you know the answer to in your hometown seem unanswerable, and a lack of new acquaintances can leave you with few sources to use.

This is where Jutland Station’s Aarhus maps come in; here we share with you everything you need to get settled into the city, on three easy-to-use interactive maps. From where to exchange currency and find free furniture and accessible transport links, to where to buy the best fruit and veg, explore exciting museums, visit trendy bars and restaurants or even take a bike-ride at the weekend.

Our first map in the series contains everything you need when you are new to Aarhus, whether you are here for a short stay or have landed on Danish soil permanently. You can use our guides to manoeuvre your way around the 2017 European Capital of Culture, and it will soon feel like home. From registration for those planning to stay for an extended period, to navigating the city’s many markets, our map has it all. Below you can read about some of our top picks, but be sure to get specific by navigating in the map itself, where you will find plenty more.

Click to see full screen

Registering as a resident
If you are staying in Aarhus for an extended period and therefore need to register as a resident, this can be done at Citizens’ Services, located at Dokk1 right by Aarhus harbour (see map). Along with registering you must also obtain a CPR (Centrale Person Register) number – this is a personal identification number which, amongst other things, allows you to access public libraries and the free Danish healthcare system. It is a legal requirement for all residents of Denmark. Non-EU citizens who intend to stay for longer than three months are required to register with the Danish Civil Registration System, and EU citizens should register within six months of arrival.

Walking Tours
There is no better way to become accustomed with a new city than going on a walking tour provided by a local expert. There are a number of groups who provide tours in Aarhus, but we’ve picked out two, from both ends of the spectrum.

The Free Walking Tour group, who’s slogan is ‘This is the “Tell me what I need to know about Aarhus in only 3 hours”- tour’, was started in 2015 by a group of guides with over 20 years’ of experience. Tours run on Saturdays between September and May, starting at 11:00 outside the Theatre at Teatergaden, and can last for two, three or five hours. All tours are free and the organisation is not funded by other means, so it is recommended that you give them a tip if you feel it was up to the standards. All tours are provided in English and they will give you an in-depth and knowledgeable insight into the city centre, taking you to sites such as the Latin Quarter, Church of our Lady, Møllestien and the ARoS art museum.

Aarhus Guides, on the other hand, provides a more professional and extensive walking tour experience. Their website boasts being “the largest and most experienced organisation of professional guides in Aarhus,” and their extensive list of various tours on offer shows that they live up to this promise. Tours are offered in a variety of languages, on a variety of topics from street art to food stops, and can be booked for large groups or private individuals. Having operated in Aarhus for over 60 years, you will be sure to get a professional, thorough and historic introduction to the city.

Food markets
One of Aarhus’ biggest assets is the various food markets and multi-cultural food stores it has on offer. Bazaar Vest, located in the west of the city, offers an abundance of food stalls housed in an old boiler factory. Here you will find everything from independent butchers and bakers, to the best pulses and spices that you wouldn’t find anywhere else in Aarhus.

Ingerslevs Boulevard Market, dubbed Denmark’s biggest food and vegetable market, is the place to go to for fresh fruit, vegetables, spices, meat, fish, Danish delicacies and even hand-made crafts. It’s open every Wednesday and Saturday, 08:00-14:00. Aarhus also has an abundance of speciality shops for those ingredients you won’t find at the local supermarket.

For example, if Far Eastern food is your favourite delicacy, there are a number of Asian food stores located all over Aarhus to satisfy your cravings. There is an Asian Food Market located at Bazaar vest; Minh Anh Trading is situated a few metres from the central train station; and Thai Binh, located to the south-west of the city and trading since 1983, is one of the largest Asian food supermarkets in Jutland. Check out the map for locations of Aarhus’ notable Asian food stores.

The city that upcycles
Denmark is renowned for being a green country, and Aarhus’ attitude towards upcycling is a reflection of this; from its numerous vintage clothing stores, to locations where you can pick up second hand furniture for free.

Some of our top picks are listed on the map, but two are worthy of further mention. Soul Shine, a vintage clothing store located in the Latin Quarter, offers a wide variety of clothing that is reasonably priced and good quality, and profits go to mental health charities. They also have a cute ‘hygge’ seating area where you can grab a coffee whilst your friend tries on some vintage finds.

REUSE is another must-know location for new Aarhusian’s. Located on the south side of town, it’s an innovative project that recycles bulky, unwanted home wear, and it’s all completely free of charge. In an attempt to encourage sustainability, the project involves individuals donating unwanted furniture and household items, so others can come and kit out their new homes for free. They also arrange pick-ups of your unwanted goods.

From registration and free introductory tours to the best food markets in town, you won’t feel new to Aarhus for long with the help of our guide. So put your bags down, settle in and sart exploring!


This is the first in Jutland Station’s Aarhus maps series. Get in touch to tell us what else you would like to see on our maps, or if you know a great place we have left out in the published ones! Keep a lookout for our other maps coming soon, including ‘From beers to burgers’ and ‘From wildlife to museums’.

Leave a Reply